Police Technology

Police Technology (310.A0)

PROGRAM PLANNER FOR FALL 2018 OR LATER The following planner indicates all the courses needed and the usual path to complete your DEC in Police Technology.

  • Students who require a mise à niveau English or French course will be required to pass it before they can take their introductory course in English or French.
  • Students will be required to pass a Ministerial Exam of Language of Instruction and a Program Comprehensive Assessment in Police Technology.
ENGLISH | 603-101-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete four (4) English courses to obtain their DEC. Courses 603-102 and 603-103 may be taken in either order only after successfully completing 603-101. Course 603-200-MQ is the 4th and last English course required. Click here to view courses list. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list.

Written Communication and Reports | 310-170-AB

This course will emphasize clear and concise note taking and report writing. Students will also be initiated into General Observation theories and, will develop their “people skills” while practising interpersonal communication (both verbal and non verbal) in a police setting.

Emergency Responder | 310-171-AB

The purpose of this course is for the students to learn to identify and treat life-threatening and non-life-threatening medical emergencies, that they may come across in their daily activities as a police officer and to assist ambulance and emergency personnel at the scene of an emergency.

Students taking this course will learn to perform such practical skills as: Patient Exams, Taking of Vital Signs, CPR, Defibrillation and treatment for Anaphylaxis.

Students will also be expected to perform skills acquired in this course during scenarios in the comprehensive assessment during their final semester.

Criminology and Judicial Process | 310-172-AB

Students learn to apply criminology concepts to police work. Students are taught to distinguish between deviant, marginal and criminal behaviours and to distinguish the various types of criminals. They learn to describe the crime situation in a given territory and estimate the risks of someone committing an offence as well as determine the course of action to be taken. The roles of the police officer and other intervening parties in the judicial and social rehabilitation processes are examined. Students learn to assess the various consequences which a judicial intervention may have on a victim, a witness or on the accused. Students learn how to collaborate with the intervening parties regarding the choice and administration of sanctions.

Quebec Legal System | 310-173-AB

Students will learn to establish the roles and responsibilities of the police force within the legal system of Québec in everyday occupational situations encountered by police officers, using the Criminal Code of Canada and its related laws, the Civil Code of Québec, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Québec Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms, and the Code of Ethics of Québec Police Officers.

They will learn to distinguish:

  1. An incident of a criminal nature from that of a civil nature.
  2. The functions of different state institutions in regards to criminal matters and of each party involved.
  3. And assess the constitutional and legal aspects of police interventions.
Police Organizations, Functions & Ethics | 310-174-AB

Students will explore a variety of professional ethical codes and apply decision-making models to dilemmas in their personal and professional lives. The other half of the course looks at the makeup of police organizations on the municipal, provincial and federal level. The students will learn to analyze the occupational and organizational aspects of the work of a patrol officer by referring to laws and regulations governing police organizations.

Interaction with Clientele | 387-213-AB

An essential component of the Police Technology Program is learning about interactions with diverse clientele. This course professionalizes the police in their dealings with marginalized groups. Students learn to understand the historical origins of each type of clientele especially in dealing with authorities. A variety of such groups will be studied in terms of their social relationships in general and with authority figures in particular. Marginalized groups may include victims of physical and sexual aggression, gays and lesbians, street kids, the mentally ill, ex-cons and the homeless.


  • Students who require a mise à niveau English or French course will be required to pass it before they can take their introductory course in English or French.
  • Students will be required to pass a Ministerial Exam of Language of Instruction and a Program Comprehensive Assessment in Police Technology.
ENGLISH | 603-1xx-MQ

After successfully completing their 603-101 course, students may choose to take either a 603-102 or a 603-103 course. Click here to view courses list. 

HUMANITIES | 345-1xx-MQ

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21_-AB. Click here to view courses list. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list. 

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE

Complementary courses provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration and are offered in six different areas. Except for Liberal Arts, Arts & Sciences and Double DEC programs, students must take two (2) complementary courses as part of their General Education requirement.
Students are encouraged to select courses from subjects that are outside their program of study;
Students can take a course from each ensemble of the same domain;
Or
Students can take a course from either ensemble of two different domains;
Or
Students can take a course from the same ensemble of two different domains;
Domain 1, Domain 2, Domain 3 , Domain 4 , Domain 5 and Domain 6

Click here to view courses list.

Emergency Responder | 310-171-AB

The purpose of this course is for the students to learn to identify and treat life-threatening and non-life-threatening medical emergencies, that they may come across in their daily activities as a police officer and to assist ambulance and emergency personnel at the scene of an emergency.

Students taking this course will learn to perform such practical skills as: Patient Exams, Taking of Vital Signs, CPR, Defibrillation and treatment for Anaphylaxis.

Students will also be expected to perform skills acquired in this course during scenarios in the comprehensive assessment during their final semester.

Stress Management and Policing | 310-270-AB

This is an advanced course in communications. There will be much focus on communication with the public, which includes plaintiffs, victims, community, ethnic groups and suspects.  Equally, subject matter will include interactions with one’s colleagues. It will also cover the presence of stress in this line of work and its impact on a police officer. There will be a better understanding of both the depression and suicide phenomena that are very present in this line of work.

Establishing the Commission of a Crime | 310-271-AB

Students will learn about the most common crimes recorded by police offices in their occupational functions. Determination of the crime committed according to relevant sections of the Criminal Code of Canada and its related laws. Learning the constituent elements of a crime and the category of a crime as well as the type of prosecution and the possible sentence. Distinction of the different and special modes of defence. Appropriate application of constitutional principles concerning the use and possible exclusion of evidence at trial due to violation of fundamental rights under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Planned and Directed Operations | 310-272-AB

The purpose of this course is to introduce second semester students to police field operations in general, as well as, planned or supervised operations. Students taking this course will: (1) learn the difference between a planned and a directed operation, (2) participate, either in workshop study groups or actual simulations of a police operation, (3) respond to events/occurrences that fall into either a planned or directed operation, (4) engage in conscious reflection regarding the manner they respond to these police operational situations, (5) produce when required, the necessary police reports, and pertinent documents in the manner prescribed by a police agency.

Interaction with Communities | 387-313-AB

This Course is an integral part of the police Technology Program and it is designed to meet competency CG-13 of this program. The course will acquaint students with some of the important issues involving members of both dominant and marginalized groups, the police and the diverse cultural communities in Canada. It acquaints students with the role that immigration and refugee settlement have played in Canada. It helps students identify manifestations of intolerance such as stereotyping and discrimination.

It addresses the follow through of policing responsibilities in fair and equitable ways that avoid discrimination against members of any ethnic or ethno cultural group. Finally, it provides students with an ability to reflect on their own capacity to communicate effectively with people from diverse backgrounds through verbal and non-verbal means and to do so using both theoretical and practical exercises in the classroom setting.


  • Students who require a mise à niveau English or French course will be required to pass it before they can take their introductory course in English or French.
  • Students will be required to pass a Ministerial Exam of Language of Instruction and a Program Comprehensive Assessment in Police Technology.
ENGLISH | 603-1xx-MQ

After successfully completing their 603-101 course, students may choose to take either a 603-102 or a 603-103 course. Click here to view courses list. 

HUMANITIES | 345-1xx-MQ

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21_-AB. Click here to view courses list.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list. 

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE

Complementary courses provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration and are offered in six different areas. Except for Liberal Arts, Arts & Sciences and Double DEC programs, students must take two (2) complementary courses as part of their General Education requirement.
Students are encouraged to select courses from subjects that are outside their program of study;
Students can take a course from each ensemble of the same domain;
Or
Students can take a course from either ensemble of two different domains;
Or
Students can take a course from the same ensemble of two different domains;
Domain 1, Domain 2, Domain 3 , Domain 4 , Domain 5 and Domain 6

Click here to view courses list.

Crime Scene Intervention | 310-370-AB

It is crucial for students to understand the importance of physical evidence found at both a crime and accident scene, and subsequently knowing how to physically deal with it, protect and preserve this forensic evidence as well as completing proper notes and reports. Justice is best served at these two types of scenes when forensic elements are properly identified, collected, preserved, packaged, labelled and forwarded to the specific specialized facility for examination. Police officers will be asked to testify professionally in court in relation to that evidence from the time of its discovery to the presentation in court.

Also in the area of recording a crime or accident scene, the patrol officer is expected to possess the ability to take good personal notes, execute a topographical survey (Plan Drawing) and record of these types of scenes.

Finally, while using prophylactic measures (taking of fingerprints for identification), the police officer is required to be able to identify an accused person for police records either at the police station, or from a crime scene with the use of fingerprints and photography.

Therefore, the general aim of this course is to furnish the student with the necessary elements of information that will enable him or her to be prepared to meet these important aspects of the patrol officer’s responsibilities which is to Intervene properly at a crime scene as a first responder.

Crime Control | 310-371-AB

Students learn to carry out control and deterrence interventions; locate a criminality problem; analyze data obtained on a problem-related situation and determine safety measures according to interventions. Students must be able to carry out interventions such as target surveillance, territory combing and verifications. Students are required to make a report and plan a follow-up.

Québec/Municipal Laws | 310-372-AB

Through the study of relevant sections of the Code of Penal Procedure, students learn how to recognize the commission of an offence against a Québec law or regulation and against a municipal or urban community by-law, as well as the enforcing of these provincial regulatory laws and by-laws in contrast with the procedures provided for under the criminal law and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Students also learn about the issuing of and service for statements of offence.

Stage Preparation | 310-373-AB

It is crucial for students to understand the importance of police work and team-work. In the fall (3rd. semester and 4th semester), the students are asked to complete a stage with a police department. In view of this, this third semester course has been identified as a preparation period for the said stage.

Proper discipline, comportment, attitude and other attributes are what is required to complete such a stage. During the Police Technology program, students have the opportunity to attend such an activity and are able to see how they will be affected by their new career. They have a chance to observe, assist and analyze police work and ascertain where they are and how they might feel about their choices. They are also able to interact with professional police officer, acquiring and integrating more knowledge relating to previous courses and courses to come.

During this course, the students will be able to select a number of stage venues of their
choice and do the said stage with specific Police departments in the greater Montreal area as well as outside Montreal such as the Sureté du Québec and other Regional Police Departments and Municipal Police departments.

They will be faced with certain challenges regarding conflict management and how to cope with the challenges that a police officer must endure outside and inside of their day-to-day activities.

Therefore, the general aim of this course is to furnish the student with the necessary elements of information that will enable him or her to be prepared to meet important aspects of the patrol officer’s responsibilities and duties including their personal lives.

Police interventions with cultural, ethnic, Indigenous and marginalized communities | 310-374-AB

TBD


  • Students who require a mise à niveau English or French course will be required to pass it before they can take their introductory course in English or French.
  • Students will be required to pass a Ministerial Exam of Language of Instruction and a Program Comprehensive Assessment in Police Technology.
ENGLISH | 603-200-AB

After successfully completing their 603-102 and 603-103 courses, students must choose a 603-200 course. Click here to view courses list.

FRENCH | 602-1xx-MQ

Every student needs one of each of the Block “A” and Block “B” courses in order to complete their DEC. For each block, there are four levels of courses: Level 1 , Level 2 , Level 3 and Level 4.
Placement in the appropriate level of French is determined by the students’ high school marks. The French Department reserves the right to change the placement of a student upon written notice. Students take the Block “B” course at the same level as the Block “A” course.
If placement determines that students do not have a college level of proficiency in French, students may be required to take remedial courses to upgrade their knowledge of the language. Click here to view courses list. 

Communication Skills and Practice | 310-470-AB

In this 4th semester course, students will continue to learn and experience report writing and the preparation of dossiers following initial interventions as well as prepare the necessary documentation for presentation to crown prosecutors.

Students will continue to learn proper note taking and fact gathering that will be presented in reports in a clear, concise and efficient manner.

Students will be introduced to interviewing a victim, a complainant or a witness as well as interrogating a suspect or an offender.

At the end of the course the student will be able to work with databases frequently used by frontline police officers. The student will be able to:

  • To identify the roles and functions of the different databases used by frontline police officers.
  • To explain the rules and regulations concerning these databases.
  • To identify the information to be collected during a police intervention in order to search the different systems.
  • To use the data correctly in order to extract the maximum information from the database to support their police interventions.
  • To use the proper interrogative computer tools.
Self Defence | 310-471-AB

Self defense for the police (Also known as Police defensive tactics), involves a variety of techniques from different martial arts but is very different from all “traditional” martial arts out there. It’s composed of a specific set of techniques and a unique training system for the police workplace that takes in consideration various components of the police work needs. Consequently, the entire course content will focus on the reality in which police officers will be exposed in their career. Students will learn techniques to defend themselves, techniques to control and restrain individuals, different methods that lead to proper handcuff positions as well as different basic tactical communication skills.

It will come to no surprise that this course is highly practical. Therefore, to achieve success, it is crucial to actively participate (A pace around 80% of a student’s capacity is highly suited), on all aspects of the course and at all times. Defensive skills, abilities, proper behaviours, physical fitness, work efficiency (warm up, drills, fights) will be evaluated and get a lot of attention.

All techniques will be put into context using the Police Use of Force Model and will be in line with l’École Nationale de Police du Québec standards, as well as various police forces needs. While ensuring their own safety and the safety of others, students will always be reminded to use force and control non collaborative individuals in the most secure way for all the persons involved in the situation.

A well-trained officer in police defensive tactics is more likely to have a positive mindset, a winning mentality and to be more efficient and more confident. As a result, this should have a positive impact on all their police interventions.

Highway Code | 310-472-AB

The Highway Code and related regulations are studied. Students learn how to record the commission of highway safety or road transportation penal offences, fill out a statement of offence and make a decision as to the use of special powers. Students learn to choose a method of servicing for the statement of offence.

Mental Health Interventions | 310-473-AB

This course is intended to increase the student’s awareness of police field operations and introduce them to police interventions with an individual with a mental health problem or a substance abuse problem. Students will:

  • Learn to analyze a situation; determine the proper level of response; initiate an appropriate intervention; consider appropriate safety precautions; determine human and physical resources at their disposal.
  • Demonstrate their ability to communicate verbally and by producing the appropriate written reports.
Stage: Field Work | 310-474-AB

It is crucial for students to understand the importance of police work and teamwork. In the fall (3rd) semester and spring (4th) semester, the students are asked to complete a stage with a police department. In view of this, this fourth semester course has been identified as the said stage period.

Proper discipline, comportment, attitude and other attributes are what is required to complete such a stage. During the Police Technology program, students have the opportunity to attend such an activity and are able to see how they will be affected by their new career. They have a chance to observe, assist and analyze police work and ascertain where they are and how they might feel about their choices. They are also able to interact with professional police officer, acquiring and integrating more knowledge relating to previous courses and courses to come, specifically Minor Interventions and Communication Skills and Practice.

During this course, the students will be able to participate in stage venues of their choices and do the said stage with a number of Police departments in the greater Montreal area as well as outside of Montreal such as the Sureté du Québec and other Regional Police Departments and Municipal Police departments.

They will be faced with certain challenges regarding conflict management and how to cope with the challenges that a police officer must endure outside and inside of their day-to-day activities.

They will also witness and observe a number of interactions between the police and the public. They will be asked to identify key elements of Minor Interventions and write a complete report in relation to their experiences.

Therefore, the general aim of this course is to furnish the students with the necessary elements of information that will enable him or her to be prepared to meet important aspects of the patrol officer’s responsibilities and duties including their personal lives.


  • Students who require a mise à niveau English or French course will be required to pass it before they can take their introductory course in English or French.
  • Students will be required to pass a Ministerial Exam of Language of Instruction and a Program Comprehensive Assessment in Police Technology.
FRENCH | 602-2xx-AB

Every student needs one of each of the Block “A” and Block “B” courses in order to complete their DEC. For each block, there are four levels of courses: Level 1 , Level 2 , Level 3 and Level 4.
Placement in the appropriate level of French is determined by the students’ high school marks. The French Department reserves the right to change the placement of a student upon written notice. Students take the Block “B” course at the same level as the Block “A” course.
If placement determines that students do not have a college level of proficiency in French, students may be required to take remedial courses to upgrade their knowledge of the language. Click here to view courses list. 

HUMANITIES | 345-21x-AB

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21_-AB. Click here to view courses list. 

Crisis Intervention | 310-570-AB

Using simulations or verbal reconstructions, students learn to apply intervention techniques to people who are in a crisis situation. The intervention techniques exclude the use of physical control or the use of force. Students must be able to assess a situation, intervene with the person in a crisis situation and self-assess their intervention.

Penal Offence Evidence | 310-571-AB

Students learn the rules of criminal and penal evidence and their practical application in the courtroom and tribunals. The analysis is divided into four parts: Fundamental principles and legal tests will be applied to a piece of information to evaluation its admissibility; An examination will be held as to the exclusion of certain types of evidence; The study of the substantial impact of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms on evidence law; An examination of how evidence is presented in a court proceeding.

Control of Violent Individuals | 310-572-AB

Students learn techniques of controlling violent individuals. Students practice in combat rooms and with simulated reconstructions of actual police interventions in which one or two people are attacked by another person or persons. Students must be able to accurately assess the danger of various aggressive situations, know how to assume a safe position and be able to control a violent person or persons in foreseeable situations and after a threat.

Impaired Driving and Reports | 310-573-AB

In this course students will learn to carry out police interventions related to impaired driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs in situations involving driving and the care and control of a motor vehicle, by using the Highway Safety Code, the Criminal Code of Canada and documentation generally used in these situations. They will also learn about the usage of an approved screening device and Physical Coordination Tests found in the Highway Safety Code.

Youth Intervention | 310-574-AB

In this course, students will learn to determine the role of the police officer in different situations involving young people in difficulty or young offenders in everyday occupational situations encountered by police officers by referring to laws and regulations relating to young people, referring to response protocols relating to young people and referring to the Entente multisectorielle relative aux enfants victimes d’abus sexuels, de mauvais traitements physiques ou d’une absence de soins menaçant leur santé physique.

Preventive Driving | 310-575-AB

Prerequisite: Students must possess a full license to take this course. Learner’s permits and probationary driver’s licenses are insufficient.
With a vehicle similar in size to a patrol car and on public roads ,students must be able to check a motor vehicle before using it and apply preventive driving precepts on a public road. Students must be able to execute special manoeuvres on a normal route as well as on a closed obstacle course. Students learn to carry out police interventions related to traffic and road accidents, direct traffic in a rural or urban environment.
In simulations, students are required to respond to accident calls involving road vehicles, take safety measures at the scene of an accident, give assistance to the injured, gather information at the scene and complete the intervention at the scene. Students are required to write a report and plan follow-up measures.


  • Students who require a mise à niveau English or French course will be required to pass it before they can take their introductory course in English or French.
  • Students will be required to pass a Ministerial Exam of Language of Instruction and a Program Comprehensive Assessment in Police Technology.
Private Law | 310-670-AB

Private law concepts are examined in the context of police interventions. Students must formulate temporary solution hypotheses in various situations of a private nature and determine ways of intervening in disputes of a private nature.

Community Intervention and Resources | 310-671-AB

Students will learn to work in partnership with different community resources and to plan and apply intervention strategies that are preventive, repressive and community-oriented. With regard to recurrent crimes that are the subject of tactical analysis by police organizations, such as robberies, breaking and enterings, vandalism, misconduct, etc., or situations of social disorder creating a feeling of insecurity, such as street gangs. Using the material required to carry out an intervention by relying on statistics, surveys on victimization and existing prevention programs and the using of software available to police officers.

Alcohol, Drugs, Narcotics | 310-673-AB

Students learn to assess the situation regarding alcoholic beverages, drugs and narcotics in a given territory and analyze data gathered following a complaint. They learn to carry out police interventions on alcohol, drugs and narcotics and about the equipment generally used by police officers to carry out this type of intervention. Students are taught safety measures to be used and how to carry out investigations in relation to offences against the law, including municipal by-laws. Report writing and follow-up are covered.

Penal Matters | 310-674-AB

Referring to events that might require the exercise of a power of arrest without a warrant excluding any type of physical control or the use of force, students learn to exercise the powers and duties of the police regarding penal matters. Students learn how to decide whether to release or detain a person in custody before he or she appears in a court of law; prepare the filing of information or of a statement of offence following an arrest without a warrant; and to assess the level of constitutionality and legality of a police investigation.

Accident Report | 310-675-AB

During this course students will learn to carry out police interventions related to traffic and traffic accidents, in situations relating to traffic obstruction, situations relating to accidents involving a joint report of automobile accident, or material damage and requiring an accident report, or physical injuries, or a hit-and-run offence, or train accidents. Using a first-aid kit, a radiotelephone, security cones, road flares and a tape to mark off an accident scene. Application of the Highway Safety Code and the use of software available to police officers. Students will also learn to direct traffic in a rural or urban environment, the appropriate choice and use of clothing and equipment, adopting of a safe position and accurate performance of movements for directing traffic, rapid and appropriate reaction to unpredictable situations and the effective use of authority.

Investigation | 310-676-AB

In the third semester, during the Crime Scene Intervention course, we have seen the importance of evidence found at different crime scenes. More and more cases are being solved with the help of physical evidence connecting suspects with crimes.

Since we are now able to identify different pieces of evidence, it is imperative that the students be able to accomplish investigations of different types in order to complete the undertaking of prosecuting offenders effectively. Once a complaint has been received, and if an offence occurred, it becomes the responsibility of the first responder/investigator to begin the investigation. A complaint is a request for assistance, concerning a situation a person is involved with. The ability to obtain the pertinent information from the client, about the situation, is crucial in determining what actions need to be taken.

There are different types of crime. Police investigations have become a challenging task that can only be accomplished through thourough legal investigative procedures. Protocols have been put in place in order to conduct investigations in a professional manner, respecting each person’s constitutional rights and dignity.

There are different types of people. Answering a call, interviewing witnesses, reassuring victims, arresting and interrogating individuals, are all important steps taken during a response by the first responder. The art of listening and questioning is a large part of the knowledge required. Police officers who have mastered this art are huge assets to their police services. This knowledge can be learned and developped in order to make the police officer more efficient as a first responder/investigator at the scene.

Therefore, the general aim of this course is to furnish the student with the necessary elements of information that will enable him/her to be prepared to meet these important aspects of the patrol officer’s responsibilities.

Physical Skills | 360-672-AB

Students are given standard tests and simulations in a gym, outdoors and in the water to ensure that they meet the physical requirements specific to police work. Students are required to perform extended running endurance tests, specific muscular tasks, and be able to clear obstacles in various situations. They are expected to be able to carry out rescue interventions in the water and successfully react to visual stimuli.


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