Arts, Literature & Communication

Arts, Literature and Communication (500.A1)

PROGRAM PLANNER FOR FALL 2015 OR LATER 500.AJ - Media 500.AH - Literature 500.AL - Languages 500.AK - Theatre 500.AE - Multidisciplinary

The Media option in the ALC program offers solid practical and theoretical training in a variety of traditional and digital arts, as well as in film and media studies.

During your studies, you will choose at least six (6) electives from the Media discipline that include an array of hands-on production courses like Animation, Digital Photography, digital media, Filmmaking, Video Production, Screenwriting, Darkroom Photography, and Writing for News, Features for broadcast Media. You may also choose among a wide-ranging line-up of theory courses which include Film Studies in genre (science fiction/horror), in directors and in National cinema (among others) and Media studies courses in documentary, popular culture and in visual communication (among others).

The Media courses take place in newly renovated classrooms and labs and are taught by passionate teachers, who are experts in their fields. You will have at your disposal the equipment you need to stimulate your creative process in multiple disciplines.  If you are creative, if you are interested in the traditional or digital arts, if you are curious about furthering your studies in communications, the arts or education, this option is for you.

Semester 1
ENGLISH | 603-101-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete four (4) English courses to obtain their DEC. Courses 603-102, 603-103 and 603-200 may be taken in either order only after successfully completing 603-101. Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-1xx-MQ

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21x-AB. Click here to view courses list.

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE

Complementary courses provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration and are offered in six different areas. Except for Liberal Arts, Arts & Sciences and Double DEC programs, students must take two (2) complementary courses as part of their General Education requirement.
Students are encouraged to select courses from subjects that are outside their program of study;
Students can take a course from each ensemble of the same domain;
Or
Students can take a course from either ensemble of two different domains;
Or
Students can take a course from the same ensemble of two different domains;
Domain 1, Domain 2, Domain 3 , Domain 4 , Domain 5 and Domain 6

Click here to view courses list.

Universe of the Arts 1: From Pre‐History to Renaissance | 502-UNA-AB

This course will introduce students to artistic and literary currents from the prehistoric to the Renaissance and will focus on experiencing the arts and understanding the role of cultural institutions.

 

Universe of the Arts is a three‐semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world from prehistoric cave painting to the present. The courses also introduce students to cultural institutions and their role in the world of the arts. As well, these courses are intended to help develop the senses and the sensibility concerning contemporary art and cultural institutions.

The purpose of these courses is to serve as the cornerstone for further studies and for future creative work. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in this course to contextualize their subsequent academic and/or creative work.

Media elective

Students must complete at least 6 electives specific to their A.L.C. option. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Media elective

Students must complete at least 6 electives specific to their A.L.C. option. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


Semester 2
ENGLISH | 603-1xx-MQ

After successfully completing their 603-101 course, students may choose to take either 603-102 or 603-103 courses. Click here to view courses list.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-1xx-MQ

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21X-AB. Click here to view courses list.

FRENCH | 602-1xx-MQ

Every student needs one of each of the Block “A” and Block “B” courses in order to complete their DEC. For each block, there are four levels of courses: Level 1 , Level 2 , Level 3 and Level 4.
Placement in the appropriate level of French is determined by the students’ high school marks. The French Department reserves the right to change the placement of a student upon written notice. Students take the Block “B” course at the same level as the Block “A” course.
If placement determines that students do not have a college level of proficiency in French, students may be required to take remedial courses to upgrade their knowledge of the language. Click here to view courses list.

Universe of the Arts 2: From Renaissance to Romanticism | 502-UNB-AB

The Universe of the Arts is a three‐semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world from prehistoric cave painting to the present. The courses also introduce students to cultural institutions and their role in the world of the arts. As well, these courses are intended to help develop the senses and the sensibility concerning contemporary art and cultural institutions.

The purpose of these courses is to serve as the cornerstone for further studies and for future creative work. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in this course to contextualize their subsequent academic and/or creative work.

Media elective

Students must complete a total of 6 electives specific to their A.L.C. option. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Media elective

Students must complete a total of 6 electives specific to their A.L.C. option. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


Semester 3
ENGLISH | 603-1xx-MQ

After successfully completing their 603-101 course, students may choose to take either 603-102 or 603-103 courses. Click here to view courses list.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-21x-AB

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21X-AB. Click here to view courses list.

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE

Complementary courses provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration and are offered in six different areas. Except for Liberal Arts, Arts & Sciences and Double DEC programs, students must take two (2) complementary courses as part of their General Education requirement.
Students are encouraged to select courses from subjects that are outside their program of study;
Students can take a course from each ensemble of the same domain;
Or
Students can take a course from either ensemble of two different domains;
Or
Students can take a course from the same ensemble of two different domains;
Domain 1, Domain 2, Domain 3 , Domain 4 , Domain 5 and Domain 6

Click here to view courses list.

Universe of the Arts 3: From Romanticism to Today | 502-UNC-AB

The Universe of the Arts is a three‐semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world from prehistoric cave painting to the present. The courses also introduce students to cultural institutions and their role in the world of the arts. As well, these courses are intended to help develop the senses and the sensibility concerning contemporary art and cultural institutions.

The purpose of these courses is to serve as the cornerstone for further studies and for future creative work. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in this course to contextualize their subsequent academic and/or creative work.

Media elective

Students must complete a total of 6 electives specific to their A.L.C. option. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Media elective

Students must complete a total of 6 electives specific to their A.L.C. option. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


Semester 4
ENGLISH | 603-200-AB

After successfully completing their 603-102 and 603-103 courses, students must choose a 603-200 course. Click here to view courses list.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list.

FRENCH | 602-2xx-AB

Every student needs one of each of the Block “A” and Block “B” courses in order to complete their DEC. For each block, there are four levels of courses: Level 1 , Level 2 , Level 3 and Level 4.
Placement in the appropriate level of French is determined by the students’ high school marks. The French Department reserves the right to change the placement of a student upon written notice. Students take the Block “B” course at the same level as the Block “A” course.
If placement determines that students do not have a college level of proficiency in French, students may be required to take remedial courses to upgrade their knowledge of the language. Click here to view courses list.

Integrating Seminar for Media Arts | 530-SEM-AB

All graduating students will produce a project in which they will connect and apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in their studies. The topic of the project will be of the student’s choosing and it will be developed and produced with faculty guidance. The final form of projects might be written (scholarly or creative) or visual/aural (photography, painting, radio, video, installation, mixed media, sound, etc.) or some combination of the two. Students are expected to take part in an exhibition of the finished projects at the end of the semester.

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


MEDIA - Option Elective Courses
Animation 1 | 530-AM1-AB

This course will introduce students to animation aesthetics and the basic techniques and tools of animation production. They will become acquainted with the relationship between the creation of images and the production of meaning in society. The visual language of animation as an art form will be of great concern. Traditional and contemporary art practices and ideas will be presented through critiques and movie presentations. Students will learn various animation techniques and they will have the opportunity to apply these techniques to their moving-images experiments.

Animation 2 | 530-AM2-AB

Animation II is a second level course for students who have developed some skills in the basic techniques of animation. The main goal of this course is to further develop the knowledge of animation aesthetics, the techniques and the tools learned in the level 1 Animation course. The emphasis will be placed on the aesthetic as well as on the technical requirements of creating a good animation portfolio and in developing the creative and analytical thinking to make a critical judgment.

Darkroom Photography 1 | 585-DR1-AB (Blended)

Film photography and digital manipulation. This is an introductory course to the basic tools and techniques of the art of Black & White Film Photography and the manifold techniques of digital manipulation of scanned film. It will acquaint students with the basics of camera handling and taking well exposed black & white photos. Films will be developed and scanned by a lab outside of the college. Students will further explore digital tools to enhance their scanned photos, to colourise them or to make a photomontage.
The course is structured for beginning students and no pre-requisite is required.
Please note: Students must have access to a 35mm film camera (ideally SLR). There are a limited number of cameras available for term rental for a fee of $34,50.
Course cost is about $50.00 for 35 mm black & white films.
Students must be able to come to the college at specific moments during the semester during or after class time to drop off their exposed films.
Students will get access to Adobe Photoshop on their laptop/computer for free.

 

Media Studies: Documentary, Photography and Popular Culture 

Horror as Social Commentary in Films and Photographs/Images
The cinematic genre of horror, although berated and frequently overlooked, serves an important social function. Like most other genres of film, horror potentially is a barometer signaling social anxiety. Horror inherently deals with taboo or disturbing subject matter, and as a consequence might be the most socially revealing. The primary concern is not so much the history of horror films, but rather what horror is. How is horror represented? What cultural function does horror serve? Why do we ‘like’ horror? This course is structured as an in-depth look at key aspects in horror films, including aesthetics. We will focus on how certain images (photographs, paintings and illustrations) and other examples of visual art have inspired horror visions.

Please note: Course cost is about $60.00 for 35mm film. Students must have access to a manual overdrive 35mm film camera. There are a limited number of cameras available for term rental.

Darkroom Photography 2 | 585-DR2-AB

The purpose of this course is to provide a framework for students to pursue their photographic practice at an intermediate level. They are introduced to advanced technical components. They develop a photographic language and learn from the work of other contemporary artists as well as that of their peers. Students must produce a final portfolio that is a coherent body of work. Through a brief written statement, in which they are encouraged to explore aesthetic and theoretical concepts, students will define their content-driven project.

Digital Photography 1 | 585-DPA-AB

Introduction to digital Photography.
This is an introductory course to the art of Digital Photography. It will acquaint students with the tools and techniques of the medium; the basics of camera handling and digital image enhancement and manipulation techniques, as well as lighting. The course is structured for beginning students and no pre-requisite is required.

Please note: Students must have access to a DSLR camera or equivalent with a manual overdrive option. The department also lends out cameras for short term use. Students must also have a minimum 16GB USB3 memory stick, for image storage & transportation. There is also a course fee of 20$.

Digital Photography 2 | 585-DPB-AB

Advanced digital Photography
Digital Photography 2 is a second level course for students who have developed some proficiency in the basic techniques of digital photography. The main focus of this course is on the bringing of an individual project to its completion, using the techniques and tools already learned in the introductory courses.

Digital Media 1 | 530-DG1-AB

This course will provide an introduction to based media arts. It is designed to teach the technical skills necessary for working on the Macintosh platform. It is also a hands-on exploration of various computer software applications. This course and looks into the relationship between technical and aesthetic factors involved in using this means of expression. Through slide, video and web site presentations students will be given an overview of technological art and artists working in these fields.

Digital Media 2 | 530-DG2-AB

This course will provide a further exploration of the tools and working methods introduced in Digital Media I. It is designed to teach the skills necessary to work with a variety of software and technical tools in the production of digital media projects. Students will experiment and further develop their knowledge of software applications specific to digital imaging, digital sound and interactivity. The emphasis will be on learning to recognize the nature of signs particular to digital media; its language, aesthetic forms and design, technical protocols and ways of working (process). Students will produce a body of work integrating different media and software (Photoshop, Animated Gif, Audacity, WordPress, Dreamweaver). Through slide, video and web site presentations students will be given an overview of technological art and artists working in contemporary media arts.

Filmmaking 1 | 530-FL1-AB

Introduction to Filmmaking is a course designed to help students acquire basic production skills and develop artistic sensibility through different forms of filmmaking. This course recognizes that filmmaking is both an individual and collaborative process. Students will work in production groups that will allow a degree of specialization and an opportunity to experience practical and creative production techniques. The three main stages of filmmaking will be covered: pre-production, production and post-production. The course will explore the relationship between various filmic elements and the production of representational and symbolic meaning.

Filmmaking 2 | 530-FL2-AB

This advanced film production course will build on the technical skills and aesthetic approaches learned in the Filmmaking 1 course. Students will explore the creative potential of various film production techniques in making a work of art. Instruction will include approaches to the writing, planning and execution of more sophisticated forms of filmmaking that combine visually expressive material, dialogue, music and sound effects. We’ll cover writing effective dialogue and the accompanying technical considerations of scene breakdown, camera action and use of microphone as well as synchronous and non-synchronous sound and dialogue editing. We will also look at a variety of experimental approaches to film-making.

Film Studies: Introduction to Film as Art | 530-FS1-AB

This course offers a foundation in understanding film as an art form. The focus of this course is learning to look closely and analytically at narrative films however documentary and animated films may also be included in our critical analysis of the art of film.

Film Studies: Genres, Directors, National Cinemas | 530-FS2-AB

This course studies the works of film directors , national cinemas and film genre all which work outside the mainstream model for narrative films as prescribed by Hollywood.

Our work will explore how the component parts of film language work both separately and together to create a film story alternative to the Hollywood style, due to a director’s signature choices and/or the cultural specifics visible and audible in different national cinemas. Our analytical studies will also include the role of audience reception in a socio-political approach to film.

Film Studies: Canadian Cinema | 530-FS3-AB

This course surveys the history, theory and practice of Québécois and Canadian cinema. The course will focus initially on the creation of The National Film Board of Canada by looking at key documentaries, animated films and short experimental works produced there. The course will also feature important films from directors such as Anne Wheeler, David Cronenberg, Alanis Obomsawin and Michel Brault, among others. One of the guiding principles of this course is to analyze the creation of a Canadian identity) through a disparate national cinema created outside of a studio system.

Film Studies: World Cinema | 530-FS5-AB

This is an advanced class focusing on innovative films made by filmmakers worldwide. This class studies how international auteur directors have used (narrative/ animated) film as a creative medium.

Film Studies: Science Fiction | 530-FS2-AB

This course will survey a selection of contemporary, mostly Hollywood science fiction films as a way of discussing our dependence on technology and examine its role in shaping our future. We will review some of the seminal sci-fi films of the last 40 years; from “Alien” to “Annihilation”. What are the characteristics of the science fiction genre? What formal and aesthetic concerns are present? How do they reflect the dominant issues of their time? What worldview can we ascribe to a film’s narrative and formal structure? Topics for discussion will include utopia / dystopian societies, invasion narratives, gender representation and the postmodern in sci-fi.

Film Studies : In Depth Study of World Animation | 530-FS4-AB

This course examines the animation works of contemporary animation filmmakers from around the globe. Overall, students will expand their understanding of animation film as an international art form as well as an entertainment medium.

It is recommended that you’ve taken Film Studies: Introduction to Film as Art (or for Media Studies) Media Studies: Introduction to Visual Culture and Communication prior to taking this course.

Media Studies A: Visual Culture and Communication | 530-MDA-AB

This course focuses on the importance of images in contemporary culture. Over the span of the last two centuries we have become a visual culture rather than a textual one. This visual aspect of culture encompasses many media forms from fine arts to popular film and television to advertising to visual data. In this course we will examine images and their meanings across such disciplinary boundaries as media studies and art history. We will focus on different mediums such as photography, television, radio, film, web and print.

Media Studies: Horror as a social commentary in films and photographs | 530-MDB-AB

The cinematic genre of horror, although berated and frequently overlooked, serves an important social function. Like most other genres of film, horror potentially is a barometer signaling social anxiety. Horror inherently deals with taboo or disturbing subject matter, and as a consequence might be the most socially revealing. The primary concern is not so much the history of horror films, but rather what horror is. How is horror represented? What cultural function does horror serve? Why do we ‘like’ horror? This course is structured as an in-depth look at key aspects in horror films, including aesthetics. We will focus on how certain images (photographs, paintings and illustrations) and other examples of visual art have inspired horror visions.

Media Studies: The Web and social media | 530-MDC-AB

This course focuses on the pervasive influence of the web and social media in societyThe course will provide an overview of the history of the web, from web 1.0, to 2.0 to the contemporary moment of social media, mobile phone ubiquity and the future of AI (artificial intelligence). We have moved from being a visual culture to being a surveillance culture. We use the web for everything: from the most mundane tasks to ones that require sophisticated web technologies to track our movements.  In this course we will examine what it means to live in a surveillance culture as it is enacted through web and social media technologies. Specifically, we will consider an intersectional approach to our study as well as a hands-on approach to understanding the circulation of knowledge on the webWe will focus on different theories as well as different artists that are responding to and working within social media culture. 

Radio Production 1 | 585-RA1-AB

In this course students will be introduced to the art of Radio Production within the general context of journalism and making radio documentaries. Students will be taught how to prepare and perform radio interviews, write and read stories for radio news, and promotions for radio through planning, creativity, writing, speech, visualization, and production techniques. These productions will be assembled and will form the content for a weekly radio show on CKUT 90.3 FM Radio McGill called John Abbott on the Air (visit website www.ckut.ca to hear past shows) heard every Saturday morning between 10:00 and 10:30 in the morning. Developing skills in conducting proper verbal interviews, how to write journalistic reports and/or effective narration, and how to use radio production equipment in the studio environment and in the field will be developed.

This course can contribute to the Environmental Studies certificate. For more information, talk to the teacher or contact the certificate coordinator at: envirostudies@johnabbott.qc.ca

Radio Production 2 | 585-RA2-AB

This is an advanced radio production course where students will be expected to further develop the skills they learned in Radio 1. Students in this course will be expected to generate their own story ideas suitable to the target audience. It is expected that students will listen to the radio and follow current events in order to come to class prepared to pitch ideas and topics. Each class will focus on some aspect of radio production where students will be expected to package stories, interviews and actualities in audio form in appropriately creative ways. Through this course, students will learn about the teamwork required to produce a radio show.

Screenwriting | 585-SW1-AB

“The truth about stories is, that’s all we are.” —  Thomas King
Stories shape who we are and how we understand the world. This class tackles the fundamentals of dramatic storytelling in a leading visual art form, the fictional film. Through screenings, discussions, and writing exercises, students will explore how film language, narrative structure, and character development interact. They will acquire creative, technical and analytical skills to develop two original narrative screenplays. This is the perfect class for anyone who wants to experience the process of creating compelling stories in film.

Video Production 1 | 585-VR1-AB

In this course, students will explore two fact-based storytelling forms, video journalism and documentary filmmaking. They will first learn digital storytelling techniques to produce a 60-90 second news report video. They will then further sharpen their skills as a visual storyteller by examining the building blocks of documentary filmmaking. Students will take part in class screenings, video production workshops, and class discussions. The final project consists in producing a compelling 4-5 minute documentary film.

Video Production 2 | 585-VR2-AB

This advanced video course will build on the various production techniques learned in the introduction to video production course. The main focus will be on the steps necessary to produce programming that is both technically proficient and of interest to the intended audience. Various video genres will be analyzed to determine the different forms of visual language used to convey the intended “message”, with the aim that these techniques may be applied to student productions. Students will also be introduced to advanced pre and post production techniques.

Writing for News, Features and Broadcast Media | 585-WR1-AB

Television, radio and the web are the most powerful forces in the world for affecting the minds, emotions and even the actions of humankind. At the heart of each medium is good writing. While curiosity, creativity and talent can be encouraged, principles and techniques of solid writing can be taught. The course is designed to provide a practical and clearly defined storytelling approach to the writing and reporting of real life events for primarily radio, and TV but also for the web. This course will help you become a writer of competent, even creative scripts for broadcast or whatever aural or visual medium you decide to make your life’s work.


“The truth about stories is that that’s all we are” – Thomas King.

Discover how to be all you are and all you can be through the literature option of the ALC program at JAC. Our staff of published and award-winning writers, poets and scholars will help you develop both your creative and your critical literary skills.  During your studies you will choose at least six literature electives – two in each of three terms — from a diverse range of options in World Literatures (Hispanic, Italian, German, Chinese) as well as from philosophy and religion courses taught from a literary perspective. There are also a number of production courses to choose from in which you learn various writing skills and how to hone your trade in print and broadcast media journalism, in screenwriting and in creative writing – fiction and poetry. These courses emphasize writing as a process, one you learn to navigate not only with the guidance of experts but with your peers: workshopping and peer-editing are creative techniques that not only improve your writing but create a supportive writing community within the larger one of your ALC Program.

Discover a vocation and help assure an occupation: students of the Literature Option are well prepared to pursue studies in a wide array of university programs, many graduates specializing in Creative Writing, Communication, Languages, or Literature degrees. And these degrees can lead to rewarding careers in the worlds of academia, business, publishing, translation, editing, in television and radio or in self-directed freelance writing.

We are our stories: write yours.

Semester 1
ENGLISH | 603-101-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete four (4) English courses to obtain their DEC. Courses 603-102, 603-103 and 603-200 may be taken in either order only after successfully completing 603-101. List of 603-101 Courses. Click here to view courses list.

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE

Complementary courses provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration and are offered in six different areas. Except for Liberal Arts, Arts & Sciences and Double DEC programs, students must take two (2) complementary courses as part of their General Education requirement.
Students are encouraged to select courses from subjects that are outside their program of study;
Students can take a course from each ensemble of the same domain;
Or
Students can take a course from either ensemble of two different domains;
Or
Students can take a course from the same ensemble of two different domains;
Domain 1, Domain 2, Domain 3 , Domain 4 , Domain 5 and Domain 6

Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-1xx-MQ

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21x-AB. Click here to view courses list.

Universe of the Arts 1: From Pre‐History to Renaissance | 502-UNA-AB

This course will introduce students to artistic and literary currents from the prehistoric to the Renaissance and will focus on experiencing the arts and understanding the role of cultural institutions.

Universe of the Arts is a three‐semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world from prehistoric cave painting to the present. The courses also introduce students to cultural institutions and their role in the world of the arts. As well, these courses are intended to help develop the senses and the sensibility concerning contemporary art and cultural institutions.

The purpose of these courses is to serve as the cornerstone for further studies and for future creative work. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in this course to contextualize their subsequent academic and/or creative work.

Literature elective

Students must complete at least 6 electives specific to their A.L.C. option (2 per semester). Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Literature elective

Students must complete at least 6 electives specific to their A.L.C. option (2 per semester). Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


Semester 2
ENGLISH | 603-1xx-MQ

After successfully completing their 603-101 course, students may choose to take either 603-102 or 603-103 courses. Click here to view courses list.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-1xx-MQ

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21X-AB. Click here to view courses list.

FRENCH | 602-1xx-MQ

Every student needs one of each of the Block “A” and Block “B” courses in order to complete their DEC. For each block, there are four levels of courses: Level 1 , Level 2 , Level 3 and Level 4.
Placement in the appropriate level of French is determined by the students’ high school marks. The French Department reserves the right to change the placement of a student upon written notice. Students take the Block “B” course at the same level as the Block “A” course.
If placement determines that students do not have a college level of proficiency in French, students may be required to take remedial courses to upgrade their knowledge of the language. Click here to view courses list.

Universe of the Arts 2 | 502-UNB-AB

The Universe of the Arts is a three‐semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world from prehistoric cave painting to the present. The courses also introduce students to cultural institutions and their role in the world of the arts. As well, these courses are intended to help develop the senses and the sensibility concerning contemporary art and cultural institutions.

The purpose of these courses is to serve as the cornerstone for further studies and for future creative work. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in this course to contextualize their subsequent academic and/or creative work.

Literature elective

Students must complete at least 6 electives specific to their A.L.C. option. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Literature elective

Students must complete at least 6 electives specific to their A.L.C. option. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


Semester 3
ENGLISH | 603-1xx-MQ

After successfully completing their 603-101 course, students may choose to take either 603-102 or 603-103 courses. Click here to view courses list.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-21x-AB

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21X-AB. Click here to view courses list.

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE

Complementary courses provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration and are offered in six different areas. Except for Liberal Arts, Arts & Sciences and Double DEC programs, students must take two (2) complementary courses as part of their General Education requirement.
Students are encouraged to select courses from subjects that are outside their program of study;
Students can take a course from each ensemble of the same domain;
Or
Students can take a course from either ensemble of two different domains;
Or
Students can take a course from the same ensemble of two different domains;
Domain 1, Domain 2, Domain 3 , Domain 4 , Domain 5 and Domain 6

Click here to view courses list.

Universe of the Arts 3 | 502-UNC-AB

The Universe of the Arts is a three‐semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world from prehistoric cave painting to the present. The courses also introduce students to cultural institutions and their role in the world of the arts. As well, these courses are intended to help develop the senses and the sensibility concerning contemporary art and cultural institutions.

The purpose of these courses is to serve as the cornerstone for further studies and for future creative work. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in this course to contextualize their subsequent academic and/or creative work.

Literature elective

Students must complete at least 6 electives specific to their A.L.C. option. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Literature elective

Students must complete at least 6 electives specific to their A.L.C. option. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


Semester 4
ENGLISH | 603-200-AB

After successfully completing their 603-102 and 603-103 courses, students must choose a 603-200 course. Click here to view courses list.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ.Click here to view courses list.

FRENCH | 602-2xx-AB

Every student needs one of each of the Block “A” and Block “B” courses in order to complete their DEC. For each block, there are four levels of courses: Level 1 , Level 2 , Level 3 and Level 4.
Placement in the appropriate level of French is determined by the students’ high school marks. The French Department reserves the right to change the placement of a student upon written notice. Students take the Block “B” course at the same level as the Block “A” course.
If placement determines that students do not have a college level of proficiency in French, students may be required to take remedial courses to upgrade their knowledge of the language. Click here to view courses list.

Integrating Seminar in Literature | 603-SEL-AB

All graduating students will produce a project in which they will connect and apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in their studies. The topic of the project will be of the student’s choosing and it will be developed and produced with faculty guidance. The final form of projects might be written (scholarly or creative) or visual/aural (photography, painting, radio, video, installation, mixed media, sound, etc.) or some combination of the two. Students are expected to take part in an exhibition of the finished projects at the end of the semester.

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


LITERATURE - Option Elective Courses
The Play: Page, Stage and Screen | 603-ED1-AB

This is primarily a course in drama. Students and teacher will read together and discuss plays. Once they have done so, they will view feature film and TV adaptations of these plays. Discussions will then focus on what was lost and what was gained in bringing the play to the screen. Students will also see a professional production of a play.

Creative Writing 1 | 603-CW1-AB

The aim of this course is to help students develop their creative writing skills, especially in the genres of fictional prose, poetry and creative non-fiction. Students will learn about important components of each genre, complete directed exercises and work on their own independent projects. A substantial portion of class time will be used for writing exercises, reading aloud, peer-editing (“workshopping”) and, when possible, meeting guest speakers.

Creative Writing 2 | 603-CW2-AB

This class will focus on the writing and discussion of what is referred to as “literary realism.” This genre is centered on human beings who react to conflicts sometimes quite minor: the loss of a job, not the end of the world; a fight with a lover, not a flight to Xenu; a mistake in a doctor’s office, not a zombie attack. These reactions prove our speakers or characters to have emotions & thoughts, and exploring their reactions allows us to empathize with them. This empathy, this ability to imagine how another human feels, is the main reason we write or read literature.

Journalism 1 | 603-JR1-AB

Introduction to News Writing
This course focuses on getting students used to observing and reporting the news using journalism’s core principles, including integrity, brevity, objectivity (taking note of the problematic nature of this ideal), clarity, and accuracy. All assignments involve hands-on first-hand interview-ing, note taking, and/or observation.

Philosophy of Art and Aesthetics | 340-PLA-AB

Humans create art.  How does this mysterious, powerful, creative capacity enrich our lives and our understanding of the human condition?  Through an examination of the recurrent problems or questions raised by this phenomenon, the student will explore the nature, value, and meaning of art.

In this course, students will examine works by some contemporary artists and use them to understand different philosophies of art better and use philosophical ideas better to understand contemporary art. Art and ideas about art are closely related.  The student will both develop techniques of analysis and criticism as well as study and apply various frameworks.  We will see how the conceptual frameworks of analysis and criticism and the objects of such treatment have changed and are changing.

Philosophy: Culture and the Construction of Reality | 340-PLR-AB

Culture and civilization are to be understood as the contested, adversarial, fluid realm of meaning expressed in the various ways human beings attempt to make sense of the world they inhabit and their experience of it. By examining the elements of culture, we will be thinking critically about the paradigms that signify our own collective and individual experience as symbol makers and symbol consumers.

Philosophy of Communication | 340-PLC-AB

Philosophy questions basic principles, assumptions, and prejudices. What can we know, and how? What is the good life? Can we achieve it? Are we free, or is every act caused? Is beauty just in the eye of the beholder’ or in beautiful things? Do we have spirits, souls, or even minds, or are we just material? Is the universe orderly or chaotic? Is there a God or many demons? Are there rules for correct thinking? Acting? Being? Philosophy students are encouraged to seek their own answers to the ‘Great Questions’ systematically and critically, in a context of familiarity with the thoughts of previous seekers. Accordingly, students will be learning, along with content, the techniques of sound thinking and argumentation and subsequently, they will be producing philosophical work based on these techniques.
This course introduces students to the field of study of Social Science through the discipline of Philosophy. Please note that first level philosophy courses constitute a prerequisite for second level ones.

World Religions | 370-WRL-AB

From a world full of spirits to a world without spirit (animism and atheism) and everything in between, this course explores the myriad expressions of belief through the stories humans have told one another. These stories have always been a rich source of inspiration to the arts.

Writing News and Features for Broadcast Media | 585-WR1-AB

This course will introduce students to some of the basic styles, principles and techniques of radio, TV and documentary writing. We will also look at how writing changes when conventional broadcast media is transported to the internet. The course is designed to provide a practical and clearly defined storytelling approach to the writing and reporting of real life events for primarily radio, and TV but also for the web. This course will help you become a writer of competent, even creative scripts for broadcast or whatever aural or visual medium you decide to make your life’s work.

Creative Writing C. | 603-CW3-AB

This course will build on what students have learned in CWA and/or CWB; student will continue to produce and share their literary work.  Students will learn the architecture of one or more genres or modes of writing: its basic structure, its concomitant “problems,” and examples of formal variation.  This study will lead to the production of a major project in one or more genres.  Depending on the instructor, this course may focus on a single genre or mode such as Creative Non-Fiction, Short or Long Fiction, Poetry, or Writing for Young Adults; students should consult the current course description for details. Pre-requisite: CWA or CWB.

History and the Novel | 603-EN1-MQ

This genre course explores twentieth century novels. In the core courses of your program, you study diverse cultures and their politics, arts, and religions. We will investigate how novel writers have worked with these materials in their texts. The rather funny novel The Evolution Man: How We Ate My Father (1963) by Roy Lewis rewrites the evolution period of the human species and poses questions such as whether humans should have suppressed the use of fire for the greater good of humankind. Ursula Le Guin said in an interview in 2014 about the writer that is needed today, “We need the realists of a larger reality.” Her own novel The Left Hand of Darkness (1969) depicts a society of androgynous humans who can assume a female or male gender, exemplified by the sentence, “The King was pregnant.” Her fictional investigations are inspired by anthropologist and sociologist concerns of the 1960, as well as Taoism. In Jeanette Winterson’s The Passion reality and fantasy mix as she tells the story of Napoleon’s cook during the Russia campaigns. Excerpts from other novels and interviews, articles, and commentary will complement our course readings. Students will practice active reading and apply analysis to the course readings in the form of essays, journals, oral presentations, and some creative work.

Introduction to Italian Literature: A Thematic Survey of Italian Literature from the Middle Ages to Today | 608-STL-AB

The purpose of the course is to give students an appreciation for the rich and diverse contribution that the Italian literary tradition has imparted on the world of literature. This survey course explores various themes throughout Italian literature from the Middle Ages to the Present. From love to lust, from the spiritual to the secular, from the dogmatic to the scientific, in peace and in war, the various topics and issues that the students will visit through the readings are not only interesting but also are very much alive and pertinent to us today. From Dante to Dacia Maraini, from Petrarch to Pirandello, from Machiavelli to Manzoni, from Galileo to Natalia Ginzburg, students will be introduced to just a sampling of the most important names and works of Italian literature, may it be prose or poetry, theatre or film. Students will apply critical reading, thinking and writing skills to a selection of excerpts and commentary, and present their thoughts in both formal and creative writing activities.
NB: This course is offered in English and any material in Italian will be presented in translation. NO prior knowledge of the Italian language is necessary.

Advance Workshop in Poetry | 603-CWC

In this course, students will study and practice several forms of poetry, with an emphasis on the creative process. Through lessons, the study of other texts and targeted exercises, students will develop the skills necessary to bring a work of poetry to fruition. Attention will be paid to finding and achieving appropriate structure. Through serious participation in the workshop method, students will have an opportunity to recognize and solve common writing problems and challenges. During the course, each student will produce a major project of fifteen pages, written and revised over a number of weeks. Students enrolled in this course will be required to share their writing, both in print and orally, with classmates, as well as the teacher.

English Literature: The Novel | 603-EN1-AB

This course will introduce students to the history, form, and function of the novel. Students will learn about the unique properties that distinguish the novel from other literary forms and will explore how novels are embedded in the social and historical contexts in which they are written. In addition to developing the critical vocabulary associated with conventional academic approaches to the novel, students will have the opportunity to explore different readerly strategies for engaging with and responding to long fiction texts.

Screenwriting | 585-SW1-AB

“The truth about stories is, that’s all we are.” —  Thomas King
Stories shape who we are and how we understand the world. This class tackles the fundamentals of dramatic storytelling in a leading visual art form, the fictional film. Through screenings, discussions, and writing exercises, students will explore how film language, narrative structure, and character development interact. They will acquire creative, technical and analytical skills to develop two original narrative screenplays. This is the perfect class for anyone who wants to experience the process of creating compelling stories in film.

Special Topics in English Literature | 603-STI-AB

There is NO generic description because the topic changes each time: In W21 Christina is teaching: “Land, People, and Encounters in Indigenous North American Literature” the full blurb for which is: Indigenous North American literature. We will explore what the notion of “land” and “belonging” means outside of the frame works of national, provincial, and state borders. Texts include the novel Kiss of the Fur Queen (1998) by Tomson Highway, the graphic novel anthology This Place: 150 Years Retold (2019) by Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm et al, film screenings, as well as a variety of short stories, poems, and non-fiction. Students will encounter some new versions of stories that they thought they already knew, and discover a rich world of imagery and symbolism describing the place we all share: our planet earth.

Special Topics in Hispanic Literature | 607-STL-AB

The primary goal of these special topics’ courses is to offer students an opportunity to explore different aspects of the extremely diverse Hispanic World Literature. An example of one of these courses, subtitled Intro to Hispanic Literature: Gender Confusion and Role Reversal in Spanish Theatre focuses student’s attention on the staggering number of theatrical pieces produced in Spain during its Golden Age. While the plays of Shakespeare, Molière, Racine and even Thomas Dekker are held in high regard authors like Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina and Calderón de la Barca, masters of Golden Age drama, are often overlooked. This course introduces students to this immensely rich and complex form of theatre and culture. Beyond reading some texts, learning about cultural and historical particularities, this course hopes to foster a tradition of revision, re-examination and reconstruction by exploring the reversal of traditional gender roles while exploring a multitude of social, cultural, racial and historical factors that both influence and determine the changing image of gender constructs. This course is offered in English and any material in Spanish will be presented in translation. NO prior knowledge of the Spanish language is necessary. 

Special Topics in Italian Literature | 608-STA-AB

The purpose of the course is to give students an appreciation for the rich and diverse contribution that the Italian literary tradition has imparted on the world of literature. This survey course explores various themes throughout Italian literature from the Middle Ages to the Present. From love to lust, from the spiritual to the secular, from the dogmatic to the scientific, in peace and in war, the various topics and issues that the students will visit through the readings are not only interesting but also are very much alive and pertinent to us today. From Dante to Dacia Maraini, from Petrarch to Pirandello, from Machiavelli to Manzoni, from Galileo to Natalia Ginzburg, students will be introduced to just a sampling of the most important names and works of Italian literature, may it be prose or poetry, theatre, or film. Students will apply critical reading, thinking, and writing skills to a selection of excerpts and commentary, and present their thoughts in both formal and creative writing activities. NB: This course is offered in English and any material in Italian will be presented in translation. NO prior knowledge of the Italian language is necessary. 

Special Topics in German Literature | 609-STL-AB

Literature of German Speaking Countries is an interdisciplinary course whose purpose is to offer students masterpieces in the literary tradition of German speaking countries, major currents, and authors. Critical chapters/sections of selected works will be chosen for the students to read. Such selections will be most representative of their historical period, dating from the 18th to the early 20th Century. Likewise, a brief historical/political/social overview will be offered prior to introducing the literature as this is most valuable to the student’s understanding and appreciation of the masterpieces. From love to lust, from the spiritual to the secular, from the dogmatic to the scientific, in peace and in war, the various themes and issues that the student will visit through the readings are not only interesting but are very much alive and pertinent to us today. Questions that guide us through the course are: In what ways do the works discussed mirror modern life experience? How do these works interrelate to culture and society in a specific context? The primary aim of this course is for the student to achieve an appreciation and understanding for German literature and to develop satisfactory skills in the interpretation of texts. As no pre-requisites in German Language are required this course is offered in English and any material in German will be presented in English translation. 


The benefits of multilingualism are undeniable. Learning languages will help you connect with others in new ways and on a different, deeper, and more fulfilling level. Perhaps you simply want to appreciate global culture, understand your favourite songs playing on the radio or watch a movie or TV show in its original language! Whatever the reason, the Languages Option allows for a flexible and personalized learning experience, catered to your individual interests regarding language acquisition. With several languages to choose from (German, Italian, Mandarin and Spanish), you are free to explore any or all of the languages offered to a level* of your choice!

Semester 1
ENGLISH | 603-101-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete four (4) English courses to obtain their DEC. Courses 603-102, 603-103 and 603-200 may be taken in either order only after successfully completing 603-101. List of 603-101 Courses. Click here to view courses list.

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE

Complementary courses provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration and are offered in six different areas. Except for Liberal Arts, Arts & Sciences and Double DEC programs, students must take two (2) complementary courses as part of their General Education requirement.
Students are encouraged to select courses from subjects that are outside their program of study;
Students can take a course from each ensemble of the same domain;
Or
Students can take a course from either ensemble of two different domains;
Or
Students can take a course from the same ensemble of two different domains;
Domain 1, Domain 2, Domain 3 , Domain 4 , Domain 5 and Domain 6

Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-1xx-MQ

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21x-AB. Click here to view courses list.

Universe of the Arts 1: From Pre‐History to Renaissance | 502-UNA-AB

This course will introduce students to artistic and literary currents from the prehistoric to the Renaissance and will focus on experiencing the arts and understanding the role of cultural institutions.

Universe of the Arts is a three‐semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world from prehistoric cave painting to the present. The courses also introduce students to cultural institutions and their role in the world of the arts. As well, these courses are intended to help develop the senses and the sensibility concerning contemporary art and cultural institutions.

The purpose of these courses is to serve as the cornerstone for further studies and for future creative work. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in this course to contextualize their subsequent academic and/or creative work.

Languages elective

Students in the Language Option must take at least 6 elective courses from the Foreign Languages discipline in their first 3 semesters, of which at least 1 must be an advanced course (i.e. Italian III, Spanish III, and German III). Students who do not meet the standard French requirement (being enrolled at Level 3 in General Education French) must take at least one (1) 602 French course as an elective. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Languages elective

Students in the Language Option must take at least 6 elective courses from the Foreign Languages discipline in their first 3 semesters, of which at least 1 must be an advanced course (i.e. Italian III, Spanish III, and German III). Students who do not meet the standard French requirement (being enrolled at Level 3 in General Education French) must take at least one (1) 602 French course as an elective. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


Semester 2
ENGLISH | 603-1xx-MQ

After successfully completing their 603-101 course, students may choose to take either 603-102 or 603-103 courses. Click here to view courses list.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-1xx-MQ

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21X-AB. Click here to view courses list.

FRENCH | 602-1xx-MQ

Every student needs one of each of the Block “A” and Block “B” courses in order to complete their DEC. For each block, there are four levels of courses: Level 1 , Level 2 , Level 3 and Level 4.
Placement in the appropriate level of French is determined by the students’ high school marks. The French Department reserves the right to change the placement of a student upon written notice. Students take the Block “B” course at the same level as the Block “A” course.
If placement determines that students do not have a college level of proficiency in French, students may be required to take remedial courses to upgrade their knowledge of the language. Click here to view courses list.

Universe of the Arts 2 | 502-UNB-AB

The Universe of the Arts is a three‐semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world from prehistoric cave painting to the present. The courses also introduce students to cultural institutions and their role in the world of the arts. As well, these courses are intended to help develop the senses and the sensibility concerning contemporary art and cultural institutions.

The purpose of these courses is to serve as the cornerstone for further studies and for future creative work. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in this course to contextualize their subsequent academic and/or creative work.

Languages elective

Students in the Language Option must take at least 6 elective courses from the Foreign Languages discipline in their first 3 semesters, of which at least 1 must be an advanced course (i.e. Italian III, Spanish III, and German III). Students who do not meet the standard French requirement (being enrolled at Level 3 in General Education French) must take at least one (1) 602 French course as an elective. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Languages elective

Students in the Language Option must take at least 6 elective courses from the Foreign Languages discipline in their first 3 semesters, of which at least 1 must be an advanced course (i.e. Italian III, Spanish III, and German III). Students who do not meet the standard French requirement (being enrolled at Level 3 in General Education French) must take at least one (1) 602 French course as an elective. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


Semester 3
ENGLISH | 603-1xx-MQ

After successfully completing their 603-101 course, students may choose to take either 603-102 or 603-103 courses. Click here to view courses list.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-21x-AB

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21X-AB. Click here to view courses list.

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE

Complementary courses provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration and are offered in six different areas. Except for Liberal Arts, Arts & Sciences and Double DEC programs, students must take two (2) complementary courses as part of their General Education requirement.
Students are encouraged to select courses from subjects that are outside their program of study;
Students can take a course from each ensemble of the same domain;
Or
Students can take a course from either ensemble of two different domains;
Or
Students can take a course from the same ensemble of two different domains;
Domain 1, Domain 2, Domain 3 , Domain 4 , Domain 5 and Domain 6

Click here to view courses list. 

Universe of the Arts 3 | 502-UNC-AB

The Universe of the Arts is a three‐semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world from prehistoric cave painting to the present. The courses also introduce students to cultural institutions and their role in the world of the arts. As well, these courses are intended to help develop the senses and the sensibility concerning contemporary art and cultural institutions.

The purpose of these courses is to serve as the cornerstone for further studies and for future creative work. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in this course to contextualize their subsequent academic and/or creative work.

Languages elective

Students in the Language Option must take at least 6 elective courses from the Foreign Languages discipline in their first 3 semesters, of which at least 1 must be an advanced course (i.e. Italian III, Spanish III, and German III). Students who do not meet the standard French requirement (being enrolled at Level 3 in General Education French) must take at least one (1) 602 French course as an elective. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Languages elective

Students in the Language Option must take at least 6 elective courses from the Foreign Languages discipline in their first 3 semesters, of which at least 1 must be an advanced course (i.e. Italian III, Spanish III, and German III). Students who do not meet the standard French requirement (being enrolled at Level 3 in General Education French) must take at least one (1) 602 French course as an elective. Course descriptions by option can be found below this planner.

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


Semester 4
ENGLISH | 603-200-AB

After successfully completing their 603-102 and 603-103 courses, students must choose a 603-200 course. Click here to view courses list.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list.

FRENCH | 602-2xx-AB

Every student needs one of each of the Block “A” and Block “B” courses in order to complete their DEC. For each block, there are four levels of courses: Level 1 , Level 2 , Level 3 and Level 4.
Placement in the appropriate level of French is determined by the students’ high school marks. The French Department reserves the right to change the placement of a student upon written notice. Students take the Block “B” course at the same level as the Block “A” course.
If placement determines that students do not have a college level of proficiency in French, students may be required to take remedial courses to upgrade their knowledge of the language.Click here to view courses list.

Integrating Seminar in Languages | 502-SEF-AB

All graduating students will produce a project in which they will connect and apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in their studies. The topic of the project will be of the student’s choosing and it will be developed and produced with faculty guidance. The final form of projects might be written (scholarly or creative) or visual/aural (photography, painting, radio, video, installation, mixed media, sound, etc.) or some combination of the two. Students are expected to take part in an exhibition of the finished projects at the end of the semester.

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


LANGUAGES - Option Elective Courses
Spanish 1 | 607-SH1-AB

The primary aim of the Spanish discipline is for the student to achieve a satisfactory command of and appreciation for the Spanish language. This course is intended and designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the target language. Beginners’ courses focus on the acquisition of basic grammatical structures and vocabulary while emphasizing the development of aural and reading comprehension as well as oral and written expression. As an integral part of the ongoing and progressive development of the four language skills, there is also the acquisition of information about the geography, cultures and linguistic variations within the Spanish-speaking world.

Spanish 2 | 607-SH2-AB

The primary aim of the Spanish discipline is for the student to achieve a satisfactory command of and appreciation for the Spanish language. Beginners’ courses focus on the acquisition of basic grammatical structures and vocabulary while emphasizing the development of aural and reading comprehension as well as oral and written expression. The level 2 Spanish class allows students with some very basic knowledge the revision and reinforcement of grammatical structures and content presented in Spanish I as well as the introduction of more complex structures and vocabulary in a gradual level of difficulty. As an integral part of the ongoing and progressive development of the four language skills, there is also the acquisition of information about the geography, cultures and linguistic variations within the Spanish-speaking world.

Spanish 3 | 607-SH3-AB

Intermediate courses emphasize on the acquisition of a good overall sense and understanding of grammatical structures and the development of linguistic and communicative competence through the integrated practice of aural and reading comprehension and aural and reading expression. Students will also be introduced to the reading and understanding of short passages from selected literary authors in the Spanish language.

Spanish 4 | 607-SH4-AB

Intermediate courses emphasize on the acquisition of a good overall sense and understanding of grammatical structures and the development of linguistic and communicative competence through the integrated practice of aural and reading comprehension and aural and reading expression. Students will also be introduced to the reading and understanding of short passages from selected literary authors in the Spanish language.

Italian 1 | 608-TA1-AB

This course is for students with no or very little knowledge of Italian. Beginner 1 course focusses on the acquisition of fundamental grammatical structures and primary vocabulary necessary in order to communicate on an everyday, basic level. All competencies (oral, written, reading and listening) are honed. Likewise, the student will receive an introduction to the cultural and geographical aspects of Italy and the Italian people (at home and abroad).
If you are not sure about the level you should register in, please contact michela.belmonte@johnabbott.qc.ca or angela.vella@johnabbott.qc.ca.

Italian 2 | 608-TA2-AB

This course is a continuation of Italian 1, or for students with some background of Italian. Italian 2 course explores further grammatical structures and vocabulary in order to build upon skills previously learned. This course will also begin to familiarize students on specific cultural topics. If you are not sure about the level you should register in, please contact michela.belmonte@johnabbott.qc.ca or angela.vella@johnabbott.qc.ca.

Italian 3 | 608-TA3-AB

This course is a continuation of Italian 2, or for students with some knowledge of Italian. The aim of this course is to expand on grammatical structures and vocabulary in order to achieve a proficient communicative level. All skills are cultivated and emphasis is placed on the development of oral and written communication of compound thoughts and ideas through cultural components. If you are not sure about the level you should register in, please contact michela.belmonte@johnabbott.qc.ca or angela.vella@johnabbott.qc.ca.

Italian 4 | 608-TA4-AB

This course is a continuation of Italian 3, or for students with some knowledge of Italian or have dialect knowledge of the language. This course refines remaining grammatical structures and vocabulary to achieve a more proficient communicative level. Emphasis is placed on the further development of oral and written communication of compound thoughts and ideas.  Cultural aspect of Italy and the Italian language are brought to the forefront. If you are not sure about the level you should register in, please contact michela.belmonte@johnabbott.qc.ca or angela.vella@johnabbott.qc.ca.

German 1 | 609-GE1-AB

These courses are for students with little or no knowledge of German. Beginner courses focus on the acquisition of the basic grammatical structures of the language while emphasizing the development of aural and reading comprehension as well as oral and written expression. Students will also acquire information about geography and cultures as well as the history of the German-speaking countries.This course corresponds to the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

German 2 | 609-GE2-AB

These courses are for students with knowledge of German. It is the continuation of the level 1 course and remains a beginner courses focused on the acquisition of the basic grammatical structures of the language while emphasizing the development of aural and reading comprehension as well as oral and written expression. Students will also acquire other information about geography and cultures as well as the history of the German-speaking countries. This course aims to complete the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

German 3 | 609-GE3-AB

This low intermediate courses emphasize the acquisition of an understanding of the more complex grammatical structures and the development of linguistic and communicative competence through the integrated practice of aural and reading comprehension and oral and written expression. Students will be presented with information on German culture and its socio-historical background. This course corresponds to the beginning of the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

German 4 | 609-GE4-AB

The German course aim to help the student achieve a satisfactory command of the German language. It focus on the acquisition of the compound and complex grammatical structures of the language while emphasizing the development of aural and reading comprehension as well as oral and written expression. This course corresponds to the end of the A2 level and aims to reach the beginning of the B1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Mandarin Chinese 1 | 613-MA1-AB

Mandarin I is designed to introduce students to the language, as well as to provide insights into the life and culture of China. Students will begin to de-mystifying the Chinese language by learning the Mandarin phonetics, some characters, and simple sentence structures. Upon completion of the course, students will acquire basic communication skills to hold simple conversations, and be able to read and write short texts. This course is intended for students who have no knowledge of the language or any Chinese dialect.

Mandarin Chinese 2 | 613-MA2-AB

Mandarin 2 is a continuation of Mandarin 1. Students will learn more characters, vocabulary and useful grammatical structures based on the knowledge learned from Mandarin 1. Upon completion of the course, students will acquire basic communication skills in order to hold simple conversations, and read and write short texts. Some aspects of Chinese culture will also be covered.

Linguistique - Les Langues du monde | 602-LDM-AB

Le cours vise l’acquisition de connaissances de base concernant la linguistique et les différentes langues du monde. Il vise aussi à développer une curiosité linguistique et sociale en regard aux différentes civilisations. On y abordera les notions générales et linguistiques sous forme de cours magistraux. Les notions et les données linguistiques relatives aux diverses langues du monde analysées seront transmises par le biais d’exposés et d’exercices.

Special Topics in Hispanic Culture | 607-STA-AB

Special Topics in Hispanic history and culture or The Spanglish Revolution´s aim is to debunk certain myths about Spanish and Latino cultures while pointing out current trends and the visibility Hispanic Culture has on the World stage. Each topic will thus reflect a new aspect of identity and culture pertaining to the extremely diverse Spanish Speaking World, and may include any combination and exploration of the following topics: The Arts and Humanities, Pop Culture of the Past and Present, Important Historical, Political and Literary Figures, The Impact and Significance of Hispanic Food, Myths and Symbols, Regional and National Identities, The Evolution and Globalization of the Spanish Language, Spanish Proverbs and Legends, The Diversity and Richness of Countries, Tourism and the Ecotourism industry, Stereotypes, Gender roles, status and symbols of social stratification, Religion, Fashion, Etiquette, Sport, etc. Students will be encouraged to make connections to themes presented in the course with current events. This course is offered in English and any material in Spanish will be presented in translation. NO prior knowledge of the Spanish language is necessary! 

Special Topics in Italian Culture | 608-STL-AB

The overall organization of this course, subtitled La dolce vita, reflects the goal of introducing students to Italian culture through various themes. Each topic will thus reflect a new aspect of identity and culture pertaining to Il Bel Paese, and may include any combination of the following topics: Regional and National Identity, The Italian Family, La questione della lingua (The Language Issue), Italian Proverbs, Food, Fashion, Etiquette, Sport, Music, The Arts and Humanities, TV and Cinema, Politics, Holidays, Tourism in Italy, Italian Youth, The Italian Immigration Story (and what it means to be italocanadese), Italian Stereotypes, Symbols of social stratification, Gender roles and status, etc. NB: This course is offered in English and any material in Italian will be presented in translation. NO prior knowledge of the Italian language is necessary. 

Special Topics in German Culture | 609-STA-AB

No description available at this time.

Special Topics in Chinese Culture | 613-STA-AB

The overall organization of this course reflects the goal of introducing students to Chinese culture. Students are expected to get general knowledge of traditional Chinese culture, including its essential elements, such as, history, philosophy, literature, religions, principles, concepts, arts, and lifestyle. Students will learn to use their critical thinking and critical judgement skills to understand Chinese culture and today’s China, as well as to find out the differences among the cultures in the world in order to develop their world views. As no pre-requisites in Chinese Language are required this course is offered in English and any material in Chinese will be presented in English translation. 


The ALC Theatre Option, referred to as Theatre Workshop, is an opportunity for students to learn about theatre by participating in theatrical productions. Theatre Workshop includes an initial semester of introduction to acting or the technical aspects of production, after which students embark on productions as either an actor or technician in their 2nd, 3rd and final semesters. When choosing to act in a production, students learn to work together as an ensemble, to analyse a text, to communicate using both their voice and bodies, and to engage in active listening. On the technical side, students learn how to work as a team, how to use tools that will benefit them practically in the future, and how to put together a large-scale project from beginning to end.  There is no audition to get into the Theatre Option in ALC.

The following pairs of Theatre courses are co-requisite and thus must be taken together. Introduction to Theatre 1 & 2, Theatre Workshop 1 & Theatre Production 1 and Theatre Workshop 2 & Theatre Production 2.

Semester 1
ENGLISH | 603-101-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete four (4) English courses to obtain their DEC. Courses 603-102, 603-103 and 603-200 may be taken in either order only after successfully completing 603-101. List of 603-101 Courses. Click here to view courses list.

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE

Complementary courses provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration and are offered in six different areas. Except for Liberal Arts, Arts & Sciences and Double DEC programs, students must take two (2) complementary courses as part of their General Education requirement.
Students are encouraged to select courses from subjects that are outside their program of study;
Students can take a course from each ensemble of the same domain;
Or
Students can take a course from either ensemble of two different domains;
Or
Students can take a course from the same ensemble of two different domains;
Domain 1, Domain 2, Domain 3 , Domain 4 , Domain 5 and Domain 6

Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-1xx-MQ

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21x-AB.Click here to view courses link.

Universe of the Arts 1: From Pre‐History to Renaissance | 502-UNA-AB

This course will introduce students to artistic and literary currents from the prehistoric to the Renaissance and will focus on experiencing the arts and understanding the role of cultural institutions.

Universe of the Arts is a three‐semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world from prehistoric cave painting to the present. The courses also introduce students to cultural institutions and their role in the world of the arts. As well, these courses are intended to help develop the senses and the sensibility concerning contemporary art and cultural institutions.

The purpose of these courses is to serve as the cornerstone for further studies and for future creative work. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in this course to contextualize their subsequent academic and/or creative work.

Theatre Workshop: Intro to Theatre 1 | 560-THA-AB

The Intro to Theatre 1 course (and the co-requisite Intro to Theatre 2 course) is designed as an introduction to theatre through one of two options: Acting or Technical. This course counts as an elective toward the completion of the Theatre Option in ALC as well as the Multidisciplinary Option. 

Theatre Workshop: Intro to Theatre 2 | 560-THB-AB

The Intro to Theatre 2 course (and the co-requisite Intro to Theatre 1 course) is designed as an introduction to theatre through one of two options: Acting or Technical. This course counts as an elective toward the completion of the Theatre Option in ALC as well as the Multidisciplinary Option. 

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


Semester 2
ENGLISH | 603-1xx-MQ

After successfully completing their 603-101 course, students may choose to take either 603-102 or 603-103 courses. Click here to view courses list.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-1xx-MQ

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21X-AB. Click here to view courses list.

FRENCH | 602-1xx-MQ

Every student needs one of each of the Block “A” and Block “B” courses in order to complete their DEC. For each block, there are four levels of courses: Level 1 , Level 2 , Level 3 and Level 4.
Placement in the appropriate level of French is determined by the students’ high school marks. The French Department reserves the right to change the placement of a student upon written notice. Students take the Block “B” course at the same level as the Block “A” course.
If placement determines that students do not have a college level of proficiency in French, students may be required to take remedial courses to upgrade their knowledge of the language. Click here to view courses list.

Universe of the Arts 2 | 502-UNB-AB

The Universe of the Arts is a three‐semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world from prehistoric cave painting to the present. The courses also introduce students to cultural institutions and their role in the world of the arts. As well, these courses are intended to help develop the senses and the sensibility concerning contemporary art and cultural institutions.

The purpose of these courses is to serve as the cornerstone for further studies and for future creative work. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in this course to contextualize their subsequent academic and/or creative work.

Theatre Workshop: Workshop 1 | 560-TPA-AB

The Workshop 1 course (and the co-requisite Production 1 course) is designed as an intermediate theatrical experience. In one of two chosen options (Acting or Technical) students will work on a public stage production, taking on the responsibilities the supervising instructor deems within their capabilities at this stage of their development. This course counts as an elective toward the completion of the Theatre Option in ALC as well as the Multidisciplinary Option. 

Theatre Workshop: Production 1 | 560-TP1-AB

The Production 1 course (and the co-requisite Workshop 1 course) is designed as an intermediate theatrical experience. In one of two chosen options (Acting or Technical) students will work on a public stage production, taking on the responsibilities the supervising instructor deems within their capabilities at this stage of their development. This course counts as an elective toward the completion of the Theatre Option in ALC as well as the Multidisciplinary Option. 

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


Semester 3
ENGLISH | 603-1xx-MQ

After successfully completing their 603-101 course, students may choose to take either 603-102 or 603-103 courses. Click here to view courses list.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-21x-AB

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21X-AB. Click here to view courses list.

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE

Complementary courses provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration and are offered in six different areas. Except for Liberal Arts, Arts & Sciences and Double DEC programs, students must take two (2) complementary courses as part of their General Education requirement.
Students are encouraged to select courses from subjects that are outside their program of study;
Students can take a course from each ensemble of the same domain;
Or
Students can take a course from either ensemble of two different domains;
Or
Students can take a course from the same ensemble of two different domains;
Domain 1, Domain 2, Domain 3 , Domain 4 , Domain 5 and Domain 6

Click here to view courses list.

Universe of the Arts 3 | 502-UNC-AB

The Universe of the Arts is a three‐semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world from prehistoric cave painting to the present. The courses also introduce students to cultural institutions and their role in the world of the arts. As well, these courses are intended to help develop the senses and the sensibility concerning contemporary art and cultural institutions.

The purpose of these courses is to serve as the cornerstone for further studies and for future creative work. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in this course to contextualize their subsequent academic and/or creative work.

Theatre Workshop: Workshop 2: (pre-req 560-THA and 560-THB) | 560-TPB-AB

The Workshop 2 course (and the co-requisite Production 2 course) will bring students further down the path to greater and much more advanced understanding and skills as a theatre practitioner. Students chose one of two options (or “Streams”): Acting or Technical. This course counts as an elective toward the completion of the Theatre Option in ALC as well as the Multidisciplinary Option. 

Theatre Workshop: Production 2: (pre-req 560-THA and 560-THB) | 560-TP2-AB

The Production 2 course (and the co-requisite Workshop 2 course) will bring students further down the path to greater and much more advanced understanding and skills as a theatre practitioner. Students chose one of two options (or “Streams”): Acting or Technical. This course counts as an elective toward the completion of the Theatre Option in ALC as well as the Multidisciplinary Option. 

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


Semester 4
ENGLISH | 603-200-AB

After successfully completing their 603-102 and 603-103 courses, students must choose a 603-200 course. Click here to view courses list.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list.

FRENCH | 602-2xx-AB

Every student needs one of each of the Block “A” and Block “B” courses in order to complete their DEC. For each block, there are four levels of courses: Level 1 , Level 2 , Level 3 and Level 4.
Placement in the appropriate level of French is determined by the students’ high school marks. The French Department reserves the right to change the placement of a student upon written notice. Students take the Block “B” course at the same level as the Block “A” course.
If placement determines that students do not have a college level of proficiency in French, students may be required to take remedial courses to upgrade their knowledge of the language. Click here to view courses list.

Integrating Activity for Theatre: (pre-req- at least 4 - 560-T__ courses) | 560-SET-AB

The Theatre Workshop Integrating Activity course is one of the final courses students in the Theatre Option will take. Acting students will demonstrate and further their knowledge of the intricacies of theatrical discourse through the stage production and technical students will prove their accumulated knowledge and skills in the build and running of the stage production. 

Theatre Workshop: Production 3: (pre-req 560-TPA and 560-TP1) | 560-TP3-AB

Taken in conjunction with the Integrating Activity for Theatre, students in Production 3 will need to demonstrate their accumulated knowledge, skill and understanding in either Acting or Technical in a final rehearsal/build process and public theatrical presentation. This course counts as an elective towards the completion of the Theatre Option in ALC as well as the Multidisciplinary Option. 

Free elective

Students can choose an elective course from any of the option course lists below.


THEATRE - Option Elective
Theatre Workshop 1 | 560-THA-AB

The Introduction to Theatre Workshop 1 course (and the co-requisite Introduction to Theatre Workshop 2 course) is designed as an introduction to theatre through one of two options: Acting or Technical. This course counts as an elective toward the completion of the Theatre Option in ALC as well as the Multidisciplinary Option.

Theatre Workshop 2 | 560-THB-AB

The Introduction to Theatre Workshop 2 course (and the co-requisite Introduction to Theatre Workshop 1 course) is designed as an introduction to theatre through one of two options (or “Streams”): Acting or Technical. This course counts as an elective toward the completion of the Theatre Option in ALC as well as the Multidisciplinary Option

Theatre Workshop: Workshop 1 | 560-TPA-AB

The Workshop 1 course (and the co-requisite Production 1 course) is designed as an intermediate theatrical experience. In one of two chosen options (Acting or Technical) students will work on a public stage production, taking on the responsibilities the supervising instructor deems within their capabilities at this stage of their development. This course counts as an elective toward the completion of the Theatre Option in ALC as well as the Multidisciplinary Option.

Theatre Workshop: Workshop 2 | 560-TPB-AB

The Workshop 2 course (and the co-requisite Production 2 course) will bring students further down the path to greater and much more advanced understanding and skills as a theatre practitioner. Students chose one of two options (or “Streams”): Acting or Technical. This course counts as an elective toward the completion of the Theatre Option in ALC as well as the Multidisciplinary Option.

Theatre Workshop: Workshop 3 | 560-TPC-AB

Taken in conjunction with the Integrating Activity for Theatre, students in Workshop  3 (and the co-requisite Production 3 course) will need to demonstrate their accumulated knowledge, skill and understanding in either Acting or Technical in a final rehearsal/build process and public theatrical presentation. This course counts as an elective towards the completion of the Theatre Option in ALC as well as the Multidisciplinary Option.

Theatre Workshop: Production 1 | 560-TP1-AB

The Production 1 course (and the co-requisite Workshop 1 course) is designed as an intermediate theatrical experience. In one of two chosen options (Acting or Technical) students will work on a public stage production, taking on the responsibilities the supervising instructor deems within their capabilities at this stage of their development. This course counts as an elective toward the completion of the Theatre Option in ALC as well as the Multidisciplinary Option.

Theatre Workshop: Production 2 | 560-TP2-AB

The Production 2 course (and the co-requisite Workshop 2 course) will bring students further down the path to greater and much more advanced understanding and skills as a theatre practitioner. Students chose one of two options (or “Streams”): Acting or Technical. This course counts as an elective toward the completion of the Theatre Option in ALC as well as the Multidisciplinary Option.

Theatre Workshop: Production 3 | 560-TP3-AB

Taken in conjunction with the Integrating Activity for Theatre, students in Production 3 (and the co-requisite Workshop 3 course) will need to demonstrate their accumulated knowledge, skill and understanding in either Acting or Technical in a final rehearsal/build process and public theatrical presentation. This course counts as an elective towards the completion of the Theatre Option in ALC as well as the Multidisciplinary Option.


If you are having trouble deciding from which option to choose, the multidisciplinary is the most flexible.  In this option, you have to choose eleven (11) electives among all of the ALC courses being offered.    Keep in mind, the multidisciplinary option IA is only offered in the Fall.   If you plan on graduating in the winter, you will need to meet with the program coordinator in order to be placed in the IA that best suits the project that you wish to pursue.

Semester 1
ENGLISH | 603-101-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete four (4) English courses to obtain their DEC. Courses 603-102, 603-103 and 603-200 may be taken in either order only after successfully completing 603-101. List of 603-101 Courses. Click here to view courses list.

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE

Complementary courses provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration and are offered in six different areas. Except for Liberal Arts, Arts & Sciences and Double DEC programs, students must take two (2) complementary courses as part of their General Education requirement.
Students are encouraged to select courses from subjects that are outside their program of study;
Students can take a course from each ensemble of the same domain;
Or
Students can take a course from either ensemble of two different domains;
Or
Students can take a course from the same ensemble of two different domains;
Domain 1, Domain 2, Domain 3 , Domain 4 , Domain 5 and Domain 6

Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-1xx-MQ
Universe of the Arts 1: From Pre‐History to Renaissance | 502-UNA-AB

This course will introduce students to artistic and literary currents from the prehistoric to the Renaissance and will focus on experiencing the arts and understanding the role of cultural institutions.

Universe of the Arts is a three‐semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world from prehistoric cave painting to the present. The courses also introduce students to cultural institutions and their role in the world of the arts. As well, these courses are intended to help develop the senses and the sensibility concerning contemporary art and cultural institutions.

The purpose of these courses is to serve as the cornerstone for further studies and for future creative work. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in this course to contextualize their subsequent academic and/or creative work.

Free elective

Students in the Multidisciplinary option may choose their electives from any option, taking into account pre-requisites.

Free elective

Students in the Multidisciplinary option may choose their electives from any option, taking into account pre-requisites.

Free elective

Students in the Multidisciplinary option may choose their electives from any option, taking into account pre-requisites.


Semester 2
ENGLISH | 603-1xx-MQ

After successfully completing their 603-101 course, students may choose to take either 603-102 or 603-103 courses. Click here to view courses list. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-1xx-MQ

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21X-AB. Click here to view courses list.

FRENCH | 602-1xx-MQ

Every student needs one of each of the Block “A” and Block “B” courses in order to complete their DEC. For each block, there are four levels of courses: Level 1 , Level 2 , Level 3 and Level 4.
Placement in the appropriate level of French is determined by the students’ high school marks. The French Department reserves the right to change the placement of a student upon written notice. Students take the Block “B” course at the same level as the Block “A” course.
If placement determines that students do not have a college level of proficiency in French, students may be required to take remedial courses to upgrade their knowledge of the language. Click here to view courses list.

Universe of the Arts 2 | 502-UNB-AB

The Universe of the Arts is a three‐semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world from prehistoric cave painting to the present. The courses also introduce students to cultural institutions and their role in the world of the arts. As well, these courses are intended to help develop the senses and the sensibility concerning contemporary art and cultural institutions.

The purpose of these courses is to serve as the cornerstone for further studies and for future creative work. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in this course to contextualize their subsequent academic and/or creative work.

Free elective

Students in the Multidisciplinary option may choose their electives from any option, taking into account pre-requisites.

Media elective

Students in the Multidisciplinary option may choose their electives from any option, taking into account pre-requisites.

Free elective

Students in the Multidisciplinary option may choose their electives from any option, taking into account pre-requisites.


Semester 3
ENGLISH | 603-1xx-MQ

After successfully completing their 603-101 course, students may choose to take either 603-102 or 603-103 courses. Click here to view courses list.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-21x-AB

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21X-AB. Click here to view courses list.

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE

Complementary courses provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration and are offered in six different areas. Except for Liberal Arts, Arts & Sciences and Double DEC programs, students must take two (2) complementary courses as part of their General Education requirement.
Students are encouraged to select courses from subjects that are outside their program of study;
Students can take a course from each ensemble of the same domain;
Or
Students can take a course from either ensemble of two different domains;
Or
Students can take a course from the same ensemble of two different domains;
Domain 1, Domain 2, Domain 3 , Domain 4 , Domain 5 and Domain 6

Click here to view courses list.

Universe of the Arts 3 | 502-UNC-AB

The Universe of the Arts is a three‐semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world from prehistoric cave painting to the present. The courses also introduce students to cultural institutions and their role in the world of the arts. As well, these courses are intended to help develop the senses and the sensibility concerning contemporary art and cultural institutions.

The purpose of these courses is to serve as the cornerstone for further studies and for future creative work. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in this course to contextualize their subsequent academic and/or creative work.

Free elective

Students in the Multidisciplinary option may choose their electives from any option, taking into account pre-requisites.

Free elective

Students in the Multidisciplinary option may choose their electives from any option.

Free elective

Students in the Multidisciplinary option may choose their electives from any option, taking into account pre-requisites.


Semester 4
ENGLISH | 603-200-AB

After successfully completing their 603-102 and 603-103 courses, students must choose a 603-200 course. Click here to view courses list. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list.

FRENCH | 602-2xx-AB

Every student needs one of each of the Block “A” and Block “B” courses in order to complete their DEC. For each block, there are four levels of courses: Level 1 , Level 2 , Level 3 and Level 4.
Placement in the appropriate level of French is determined by the students’ high school marks. The French Department reserves the right to change the placement of a student upon written notice. Students take the Block “B” course at the same level as the Block “A” course.
If placement determines that students do not have a college level of proficiency in French, students may be required to take remedial courses to upgrade their knowledge of the language. Click here to view courses list.

Integrating Seminar - Multidisciplinary | 502-SEG-AB

All graduating students will produce a project in which they will connect and apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in their studies. The topic of the project will be of the student’s choosing and it will be developed and produced with faculty guidance. The final form of projects might be written (scholarly or creative) or visual/aural (photography, painting, radio, video, installation, mixed media, sound, etc.) or some combination of the two. Students are expected to take part in an exhibition of the finished projects at the end of the semester.

Free elective

Students in the Multidisciplinary option may choose their electives from any option, taking into account pre-requisites.

Free elective

Students in the Multidisciplinary option may choose their electives from any option, taking into account pre-requisites.


MULTIDISCIPLINARY - Option Elective Courses

Note: Students in the Multidisciplinary option may choose their electives from any option.

Painting and Drawing 1 | 510-PR1-AB

This course is intended as an introduction to elementary principles and techniques of drawing and painting. Through studio assignments and guided individual projects, students will develop a basic working knowledge of selected materials and techniques allowing them to work towards a unique artistic vocabulary of their own. Theory and practice of painting and drawing will also be considered in relation to broader artistic and cultural horizons.

Art History: Modern to Contemporary | 520-AHM-AB

Twentieth century was full of provocative and challenging ideas about art. Contemporary art is both, a continuation and a reaction to the previous art forms. Are aesthetic value and meaning of art simply the product of the time in which they were created? Class activities will focus on discussion of specific styles,  artists, and artworks, from a variety of viewpoints.


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